Our Researchers

Project 1: Antarctic Ice Dynamics

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Richard Levy PI

Richard started his Antarctic research career with the US in the early 90’s and has been involved in New Zealand led research since 2009. He is currently the Environment and Climate Theme Leader at GNS Science and an Associate Professor at Victoria University of Wellington. Richard is fascinated by the history of our planet and how our Earth system has evolved through time. Understanding how Antarctica has changed through time is a focus of his research, he says the fact this knowledge can help the world prepare for, and adapt to, climate change makes it all the more rewarding.

For more information about Richard’s research background please click here

Huw Horgan

Huw Horgan Co-PI

Huw has been part of and led 12 polar seasons in Antarctica and Greenland, and has been involved in Antarctic research since the early 2000s. He is currently a Senior Lecturer in Geophysical Glaciology at Victoria University of Wellington’s Antarctic Research Centre. With a specific interest in the mechanics of rapid ice flow, Huw says Antarctica has the potential to dramatically change sea level within our lifetimes.

For more information about Huw’s research background please click here

Project 2: Antarctic Ocean-Atmosphere Coupling

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Craig Stevens PI

Craig has been involved in Antarctic research for over 15 years. He is currently the Principal Marine Physics Scientist at NIWA and an Associate Professor at the University of Auckland. Craig is interested in Antarctic research because he says it is the sharp end of where climate change is happening on the planet and an amazing system to discover news things about how the world works.

For more information about Craig’s research background please click here

Project 3: Ross Sea Region Ecosystem Dynamics

Miles Lamare

Miles Lamare PI

Miles’ Antarctic research journey began in 1992 with the American programme. He is currently an Associate Professor at the University of Otago’s Department of Marine Science. With over 20 years Antarctic research experience Miles says in a warming world transferring fundamental knowledge of Antarctic biology into how the ecosystem may look in the future is important and rewarding.

For more information about Miles' research Please click here

Victoria Valley Fullbody

Charles Lee Co-PI

Antarctica’s unique ecosystems have captured Charlie’s research attention for 12 years. The Senior Lecturer at University of Waikato believes that fundamental and unique insights gained from studying Antarctic ecosystems can underpin our understanding of important ecological processes everywhere.

For more information about Charlie’s research background please click here

Project 4: Sea Ice and Carbon Cycle Feedbacks

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James Renwick PI

James’ Antarctic research career began around 20 years ago when he started analysing sea ice data. He is the Head of the School of Geography, Environment and Earth Science at Victoria University of Wellington and a Professor of Physical Geography. James says Antarctic research is important because it’s fascinating, unique, extreme and critical to the global climate. The more he looks at sea ice the more interesting it becomes.

For more information about James’ research background please click here

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Natalie Robinson Co-PI

Natalie got into Antarctic research because she says it’s a fascinating place to study with new discoveries to be made every time you go south. She is currently a Marine Physicist at NIWA continuing her research journey which began in 2003. She says it is now imperative to better understand Antarctica’s role in the climate system and predict its response to a warming world.

For more information about Natalie’s research please click here

Liz On Glacier

Liz Keller Co-PI

Liz’s Antarctic journey began with the RICE Project and analysing ice core data. She is currently a Data Scientist and Modeller at GNS Science. Liz says Antarctica is important to her because although it is isolated and far away, what happens there can have enormous global consequences. She is fascinated by what we can learn about the earth’s climate thousands and millions of years ago by drilling into the ice sheet and ocean floor.

For more information about Liz’s research background please click here