National Modelling Hub

The National Modelling Hub aims to facilitate interdisciplinary interactions between diverse numerical modelling experts, bringing perspectives and skills to the wider science community.

Hub Partners

The Antarctic Science Platform National Modelling Hub was conceived in 2019 and established in 2020, building on long standing partnerships between NIWA, Victoria University of Wellington and GNS Science. Research Fellows are co-located in the National Modelling Hub, hosted by Victoria University of Wellington. The Hub is managed by Associate Prof. Nick Golledge and Dr. Liz Keller, Co-Chairs of the Future Projections Expert Group. The Fellows share their time between their employing institution and the hub.

Modelling Fellows & Projects

Regional Climate Modeller: Alexandra Gossart

Funded by: Antarctic Science Platform (aligned to Project 1)

Project Scope

Near-surface climate provides an essential boundary condition for most physical and biological systems, and its accurate simulation is fundamental to future projections of Antarctic environments. The fellows, with skills in atmospheric modelling at high spatial and temporal resolutions, provide inputs to ice sheet and ocean models, terrestrial geo-statistical models, glacial surface energy balance models and terrestrial hydrological routing models. This research fellowship uses skills in atmospheric modelling at high spatial and temporal resolutions to provide inputs to ice sheet and ocean models, terrestrial geo-statistical models, glacial surface energy balance models and terrestrial hydrological routing models.

Alexandra gossart

Process-scale ice shelf cavity modeller: Alena Malyarenko

Funded by: Antarctic Science Platform (aligned to Project 2)

Project Scope

Ocean processes drive significant changes in ice shelf evolution over hourly (tidal) to decadal or longer timescales. Process understanding is fundamental to making accurate future projections. This project uses simulations of ice-ocean interactions at ice shelf cavity scales. The ocean-ice modelling project seeks to capture details of cavity circulation and explore the roles of

  • under ice basal processes (parameterisations, role of basal topography),
  • internal processes (double diffusion, internal waves at high latitude), and
  • non-hydrostatic processes (i.e. grounding-line, ice shelf front).

The project works towards coupling the modelling with glaciological and Global Climate Model modelling required to explore ice sheet evolution arising from interactions with a changing ocean.

Alena Malyarenko

Biogeochemical modeller: Angela Bahamondes-Domingues

Funded by: Antarctic Science Platform (aligned to Project 3)

Project Scope

By underpinning all life on Earth, biogeochemical aspects of the global climate system are a fundamental part of Earth system modelling. This project focusses on biogeochemical modelling under past and present conditions, as well as those anticipated for the future. This project focuses on carbon cycle and biogeochemical modelling at the regional scale, with emphasis on specific species and processes relevant to high-latitude Southern Ocean ecosystems. This project investigates changes to phytoplankton ecosystems and impacts on the marine carbon cycle under future warming scenarios, including feedbacks between changes in physical systems (ocean and atmospheric circulation, sea ice, meltwater, etc) and biogeochemical components.

Ice Ocean

Data Scientist: Mario Krapp

Funded by: Antarctic Science Platform (Cross-Project)

Project Scope

Much of the observational and numerical simulation work undertaken through the research strands of the New Zealand Antarctic Science Platform as a whole will generate large datasets. Novel insights can be gleaned from ‘Big Data’ when statistical approaches are applied. This project provides a data-driven multidisciplinary perspective on the data generated from the platform. Our aspiration is to utilise techniques such as Bayesian networks, statistical emulation, or machine learning to provide additional approaches for the generation of policy-relevant information. This project could also contribute specifically to more statistically- (rather than process-) based research questions, such as future projections of species distribution and population change.

Mario krapp

Sea-Ice Modeller: Max Thomas

Funded by: Antarctic Science Platform (aligned to Project 4); Deep South National Science Challenge

Project Scope

Sea ice and ocean processes important to New Zealand climate are affected by fresh meltwater entering the Southern Ocean from ice shelves and icebergs around Antarctica. The magnitude of these fluxes, and the rate at which they enter the ocean, is spatially variable and the rate of change is not uniform. This project develops the New Zealand Earth system Model to more realistically represent melt around Antarctica by introducing spatial variability to the rate of change. A coupled climate-sea ice model facilitates realistic projections for examining New Zealand’s climate sensitivity to the disintegration of specific ice shelves, and facilitate model experiments that are likely to be increasingly useful both in NZ and internationally in the future.

One of the seismic lines this one heads perpendicular to ice flow right to left

Aligned Modelling Projects