Seed Projects

The Platform is supporting a range of short-medium term ‘seed’ projects, alongside our core long-term projects. This allows us to be responsive to changing research priorities and new opportunities, and to incorporate new talent and capability.

Opportunity Projects

The Antarctic Science Platform’s Opportunities Fund aims to support researchers taking advantage of unexpected, high priority opportunities, aligned to the Platform goals.

Funded projects will be detailed here in future.

2019 Contestable Funding Round

A small contestable research funding round was run in 2019, with a focus on data analysis and the development of early career researchers.

Funded Projects

Dr. Greg Bodeker (Bodeker Scientific) was awarded $15,000 to update and expand on an earlier set of metrics describing the state of the ozone layer over Antarctica to support international policy and to allow modellers to validate their models of Antarctic climate change.

PhD Candidate Gemma Brett (University of Canterbury) was awarded $15,000 to use satellite images to identify regions where ice shelf meltwater outflows and affects sea ice thickness in McMurdo Sound.

Dr. Kyle Clem (Victoria University of Wellington) was awarded $10,000 to learn how to examine how the wind patterns around West Antarctica bring warm water underneath the ice shelves causing accelerated ice loss.

Prof. David Prior (University of Otago) was awarded $20,000 to map the ice crystal microstructure of samples that have been collected from the shear margins of the Whillans ice stream to better understand ice sheet behaviour.

Dr. Helena Sodergren (University of Canterbury) was awarded $20,000 to use satellite data and climate model output to look at how surface warming over Antarctica could cause Polar Amplification that leads to stronger warming in the polar region compared to global averages.

PhD Candidate Abhijith Ulayottil Venugopal (Victoria University of Wellington) was awarded $20,000 to analyse the precise phasing of warming between Greenland and Antarctica using data from the well dated RICE ice core.