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Antarctic Sea Ice 01 Physical Role

Antarctic Sea Ice #1: Physical role and function

Authors: Kyle Clem, Rob Massom, Sharon Stammerjohn and Phillip Reid
Year Published: 2022
Document Type: Reports
Ownership: Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research
Summary: Sea ice – comprising frozen seawater in the form of both moving pack ice and stationary coastal landfast ice (fast ice) – is of major climatic, ecological and societal importance. This summary on SCAR's Environments Portal is based on the best available science.
Antarctic Sea Ice 02 Biological Importance

Antarctic Sea Ice #2: Biological Importance

Authors: Kyle Clem, Rob Massom, Sharon Stammerjohn and Phillip Reid
Year Published: 2022
Document Type: Reports
Ownership: Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research
Summary: Antarctic sea ice, in the form of immobile coastal “fast ice” and the more extensive moving pack ice supports one of the most extensive and productive ecosystems on Earth and is crucial to the structure and function of Southern Ocean marine ecosystems that are highly attuned to its presence and seasonal rhythms. This summary on SCAR's Antarctic Environments Portal is based on the best available science.
Antarctic Sea Ice 03 Trends

Antarctic Sea Ice #3: Trends and Future Projections

Authors: Kyle Clem, Rob Massom, Sharon Stammerjohn and Phillip Reid
Year Published: 2022
Document Type: Reports
Ownership: Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research
Summary: Since reliable and continuous satellite records began in 1979, there have been strong regionally- and seasonally-varying patterns of change and variability in sea-ice extent around Antarctica – in contrast to a largely uniform loss of sea ice across the Arctic. This summary on SCAR's Antarctic Environments Portal is based on the best available science.
Figure 1 diverse and pristine Antarctic seafloor communities

Changes in the Ross Sea and the future of carbon storage

Authors: Miles Lamare, Vonda Cummings, Ian Hawes and Rowan Howard-Williams
Year Published: 2022
Document Type: Cold Call Articles
Ownership: Antarctic Science Platform
Summary: The Southern Ocean mops up anthropogenic CO2 emissions. But acting as a ‘sink’ for this excess heat and carbon dioxide is having an effect on the ocean and the ecosystems it supports.