Knowledge Hub

Explore our repository of research outputs and information.

We aim to share and communicate our research, to benefit New Zealand and the international community. You can browse, filter by category or type, or search by keywords.

Figure 1 diverse and pristine Antarctic seafloor communities

Changes in the Ross Sea and the future of carbon storage

Authors: Miles Lamare, Vonda Cummings, Ian Hawes and Rowan Howard-Williams
Year Published: 2022
Document Type: Cold Call Articles
Ownership: Antarctic Science Platform
Summary: The Southern Ocean mops up anthropogenic CO2 emissions. But acting as a ‘sink’ for this excess heat and carbon dioxide is having an effect on the ocean and the ecosystems it supports.
Air flask collecting

The Southern Ocean carbon sink: Will it fill up?

Authors: Jocelyn Turnbull and Rowan Howard-Williams
Year Published: 2022
Document Type: Cold Call Articles
Ownership: Antarctic Science Platform
Summary: A key question for understanding future climate impacts is what drives the uptake of carbon into sinks, and how that might change. The Southern Ocean absorbs by far the most carbon dioxide of any region of the world.
Scott Base sunrise

What's going on with Antarctica's weather?

Authors: Tim Naish, James Renwick, Kyle Clem and Rowan Howard-Williams
Year Published: 2022
Document Type: Cold Call Articles
Ownership: Antarctic Science Platform
Summary: One of the coldest places on Earth recently experienced a spike in temperature 40°C above normal. Should we be worried?
Choosing the future for antarctica

Choosing the future of Antarctica

Authors: S. R. Rintoul, S.L. Chown, R.M. DeCento, et all
Year Published: 2021
Document Type: Papers
Summary: We present two narratives on the future of Antarctica and the Southern Ocean, from the perspective of an observer looking back from 2070. In the first scenario, greenhouse gas emissions remained unchecked, the climate continued to warm, and the policy response was ineffective; this had large ramifications in Antarctica and the Southern Ocean, with worldwide impacts. In the second scenario, ambitious action was taken to limit greenhouse gas emissions and to establish policies that reduced anthropogenic pressure on the environment, slowing the rate of change in Antarctica.